thescienceofreality

thescienceofreality:

Marvel and Natalie Portman Announce Mentoring Program For Young Women Interested in STEM fields.

By Amy Ratcliffe. | Nerd Approved | Image Credit: Marvel logo via Wiki, second image via From Quarks to Quasars.

Marvel’s looking for the next Jane Foster. The character in Thor and Thor: The Dark World is an astrophysicist. Natalie Portman enjoyed getting to play a scientist, and she believes it’s a smart move to encourage girls to take on those kind of roles. Enter the Ultimate Mentor Adventure. The program will put young women interested in STEM fields (science technology, engineering, and mathematics) in the real world with successful women in those fields. They’ll get to ask questions and receive advice from women who have already blazed the trail. I think it’s one of the coolest things Marvel has done.

To enter the program, you must be 14 years or older and enrolled in grades 9-12. Once you complete an application form, you find a woman working in a STEM field in your area. Marvel has linked helpful resources to help you find someone. Finally, you create a video about yourself and submit it. The best videos will win a grand trip prize to Los Angeles to see the movie, participate in a documentary short, and to go behind the scenes of places like Disneyland.

Submissions are due by October 20 and even though winning is awesome, I think the best part will be finding a scientist to interview and receive mentorship from.

(via justJENN)

Learn more on contest rules and how to enter here.

womenrockscience

womenrockscience:


15 year old Ann Makosinsk from Victoria Canada has invented a flashlight that doesn’t need batteries and instead is powered by the warmth of our hands. She was researching alternative energy methods when she came across the
Peltier tile, a tile which generates electricity when cool on one…

xicanacoder
xicanacoder:

This month’s WIRED cover features 12-year-old Paloma Noyola Bueno, currently the top ranking student in México. This cover story filled me with joy and not because it’s focused on poverty in borderlands and autodidactism (although that’s definitely a plus), but because it’s heartening to know that there is people like Sergio Juárez Correa creating contrast in education in Mexico, especially in poverty-stricken areas that don’t have a lot of resources. Juárez Correa, tired of ineffective teaching methods and fruitless results, began to research new teaching methods and came across Sugata Mitra’s methods on self-directed learning. Mitra is best known for his experiments in India where he left computers for children to use and “without any instruction, they were able to teach themselves a surprising variety of things, from DNA replication to English.”
With the first trial of self-directed learning lessons, Juárez Correa, not only was able to bring down the national standardized exam fail rates (from 45 percent in math to 7 percent and 31 percent in Spanish to 3.5 percent), but he was able to bring his students to the top of the math and Spanish rankings in Mexico. He also didn’t just lead self-directed learning in math and Spanish, but in other topics including controversial topics.

Juárez Correa began hosting regular debates in class, and he didn’t shy away from controversial topics. He asked the kids if they thought homosexuality and abortion should be permitted. He asked them to figure out what the Mexican government should do, if anything, about immigration to the US. Once he asked a question, he would stand back and let them engage one another.

The article has great studies that have been done on self-directed learning. You can read the article here.
“The bottom line is, if you’re not the one controlling your learning, you’re not going to learn as well.”

Fabulous

xicanacoder:

This month’s WIRED cover features 12-year-old Paloma Noyola Bueno, currently the top ranking student in México. This cover story filled me with joy and not because it’s focused on poverty in borderlands and autodidactism (although that’s definitely a plus), but because it’s heartening to know that there is people like Sergio Juárez Correa creating contrast in education in Mexico, especially in poverty-stricken areas that don’t have a lot of resources. Juárez Correa, tired of ineffective teaching methods and fruitless results, began to research new teaching methods and came across Sugata Mitra’s methods on self-directed learning. Mitra is best known for his experiments in India where he left computers for children to use and “without any instruction, they were able to teach themselves a surprising variety of things, from DNA replication to English.”

With the first trial of self-directed learning lessons, Juárez Correa, not only was able to bring down the national standardized exam fail rates (from 45 percent in math to 7 percent and 31 percent in Spanish to 3.5 percent), but he was able to bring his students to the top of the math and Spanish rankings in Mexico. He also didn’t just lead self-directed learning in math and Spanish, but in other topics including controversial topics.

Juárez Correa began hosting regular debates in class, and he didn’t shy away from controversial topics. He asked the kids if they thought homosexuality and abortion should be permitted. He asked them to figure out what the Mexican government should do, if anything, about immigration to the US. Once he asked a question, he would stand back and let them engage one another.

The article has great studies that have been done on self-directed learning. You can read the article here.

“The bottom line is, if you’re not the one controlling your learning, you’re not going to learn as well.”

Fabulous